Adjective Position

Spanish adjective positionSpanish adjectives may be found before or after the nouns they modify, depending on various factors. Generally speaking, descriptive adjectives follow nouns, while limiting adjectives precede nouns.

   

Adjectives

Spanish adjectivesOne of the eight parts of speech, adjectives are a type of modifier; that is, they modify or describe nouns in a certain way, letting you know the size, shape, weight, color, nationality, or any of a myriad other possible qualities of nouns.

   

Adverbs of Manner

Spanish adverbs of mannerAdverbs of manner express how the action of a verb occurs. In English, the vast majority of adverbs of manner end in -ly, whereas in Spanish, they mostly end in –mente. They are usually created from adjectives.

   

Apocopes

Spanish apocopes
Many Spanish nouns and adjectives have shortened forms called apocopes, which are created by dropping one or more syllables at the end of the word. They’re often informal and some are regional, so be careful using them as they might be inappropriate and/or unknown in certain places.

   

Augmentatives

Spanish augmentativesIn Spanish, suffixes called augmentatives can be added to nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and names to indicate bigness, as well as other ideas such as excessiveness, contempt, or disdain. In this way, you can say that something is big without adding an adjective like grande to indicate bigness or repugnante to indicate contempt.

   

Cuyo – Relative Adjective

Cuyo - cuyaCuyo is a relative adjective that means “whose,” “of whom,” or “of which.” It indicates the noun which is the object of the clause that follows it.

   

Demonstrative Adjectives

Spanish demonstrative adjectivesDemonstrative adjectives (this, that) are used to indicate a specific noun or nouns. In Spanish, they must agree with the noun(s) in gender and number, and there are 3 different sets: este, ese, aquel.